Category Archives: Chronic Illness

Universal Drug Program Dreams

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As someone with a chronic illness, a universal drug plan would significantly improve my quality of life. I’m apparently “not insurable” on my own and since Jay and I are both self employed I can’t piggyback on an employers health plan. Is it fair that I’m expected to dish out hundreds of dollars a month for medications I would die without because I happen to have a disease (that I didn’t cause)?

New research is coming to light that suggests it would SAVE Canada money to implement a universal drug plan.

Canada is the only developed country with universal health insurance coverage that does not also offer universal prescription drug benefits.

About one in 10 Canadians say they can’t afford to take their medications as prescribed, previous studies suggest.

If I couldn’t afford my medications I’d be spending a lot more time in the ER. But it’s not like each ER visit costs the government more than a months worth of medication would. Oh, wait…

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Hiring and Firing the Disabled

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I know what it fees like to be discriminated against at work based on a disability. I have heard the thinly veiled excuses and the felt the drastic shift in attitude towards me. I didn’t press the matter, but I probably could have had I wanted to. In my case it was regarding a temporary issue, which made me even more frustrated. I wasn’t quite as productive while I was ill as I would have been at 100%, but I was fully trained and still carrying a considerable work load. It wasn’t only morally wrong to pick on me, but financially stupid as well. It’s human nature to want to contribute and feel valuable, and everyone who is capable should be allowed to work and support themselves. But, when we take emotions and ideals out of the equation, what are we left with and how should we navigate through it?

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Who Am I?

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When we are kids it seems like most interactions with adults are just endless streams of questions focusing around what we want to be when we grow up. It’s around this time when we start to think about our personalities, what we like and what we don’t like, and what we are capable of. Over the years we develop a distinct personality and we learn what makes us happy; these things begin to define who we are. Most people manage to hang on to parts of their younger selves, but slowly lose their grip on other parts, leading to the dreaded midlife crisis. Most people trade in parts of themselves for a better job, being a good spouse, or to have children; they become the husband, mother, or boss. But what happens when you are forced to focus your energy on a chronic illness? It becomes a defining feature in your life, often taking over completely.

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REDLAB- A University of Guelph Initiative

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While reading my alumni magazine for the University of Guelph I came across Project Revision. The project, which is led by Carla Rice, a professor in U of G’s Department of Family Relations and Applied Nutrition, “uses arts-based methods to dismantle stereotypical understandings of disability and difference that can create barriers to healthcare, education, and inclusion in society.”

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